The Atlantean, in the shadows of Olympus

The Atlantean bound himself with chains. Chains which he himself do not have the strength to break. All of Greece throw stones at him, because he has been tagged selfish for his nonchalant approach on the matters at hand. They persecute, ridicule and insult him for his silence, his stolidity over the circumstance around.

The non-omnipotent Atlantean, silently endures for what he thinks is right. He has seen what the God’s can do to beings of less, beings of a more unrefined approach. The Atlantean silently sacrifices everything, including ascension and equity, in a final chess match with the Gods. His resolve is unwavering, it is only a matter of time. How long will it take for the Gods to realize that without the Greeks and the Atlanteans, Olympus is nothing but an illusion?

The Gods reach out for the Atlantean, the Atlantean recognizes it, but he cannot beleive easily that it is for real. The Atlantean, holds on to his chains, for those who do not understand the underlying current. In the Atlantean’s eyes, the gods have violated time-tested principles and have in a way utilized lack of cognition on the part of the Greeks. The Atlantean has within him an opportunity to ascend, but ascension means nothing when the parapets are made of clay and the soul is inebriated with pretense.

His scars and wounds run deep and dark as the Styx. Yet the fire in his eyes flash brightly. A melancholic mixture of pain, anger, compassion and fiery drive.Truly, history is for the mortals, because the Gods have forgotten the past. They have forgotten that which has spurned the bloodshot in his eyes. He does not choose to let go of the memories, he cannot allow himself to be a part of a tribunal that does not hold dear that which he treasures.

The Atlantean became strong because of his desire to be strong, through the opportunities granted by a foreign feudal lord. When the Gods tore him up, he still chose to be strong. They have castigated him for sins not of his making. They have declared him incapable so many times. They have transferred his winnings to their favorite demi-Gods. And most painful of all, was that they have struck him a fatal blow of betrayal. And now that their favorite demi-Gods are gone, they seek him, the Atlantean.

The Atlantean smiles on the reversal of fortune. He knows that his strength lies within those chains and in a methodical sense of awareness. The friendly game of chess starts soon. He gains right to moral high ground for as long as those chains are bound intact. His awareness tells him that the time for the Olympians to dance with their destiny is coming. The Olympian’s ideology has to change, to save itself from an imminent doom whose shadows already tower on one of Olympus’s founding cities. The time of reckoning has come and it is only a matter of time before he can break free from the chains and get out of Olympus’ rule.

Though afraid of an immediate future, he suffers patiently. He feels it in his veins that the Gods will be punished for not setting things right from the very start. But by virtue of a celestial rule, the Atlantean will be charged of fixing that which the Gods have broken. The Gods cannot fix it because they have forgotten, what makes the Atlantean an Atlantean. The Gods have lavished with too much Ambrosia.

There will be no fight, no war. The Atlantean is not interested in such. And though in agony, he does not wish further pain for anyone. However, he dreams of the day when the Olympians start remembering how it was to be a lowly Greek. And that abiding by time-tested principles will always be boon to Olympus. The Atlantean seeks change within Olympus, a change that he thinks must be orchestrated by the Gods. As for him, he has decided to seek Atlantis and serve Atlantean Gods.If not, Anubis, or the one they call Christ might be a better God for him. Olympus is no place for him.

And only time will tell whether he can truly ascend or end up in the darkest pits of Tartarus.

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